study abroad

imgres-2August 2nd is Qixi Festival (Chinese Valentines Day). Love and marriage can become an issue for students going abroad. Some couples will find a way to keep things together no matter what and face the future together, others will give up with a sigh and continue their search.

 

 

How hard is it for students abroad to understand themselves?

One student named Alex, who is working on his PhD in Math while abroad, calculated that the probability of finding a girlfriend in one year of study abroad is 17.1%. Using Bayesian statistics, he found the probability of marrying this girlfriend is just 5.6%.

An investigation of over 3000 study abroad returnees entitled Large-Scale Investigation of Students Returning from Study Abroad shows those studying abroad were most distressed by “emotional isolation”. National and high-level Psychological Counsellor Zhou Xiaopeng explained, “100% of study abroad students counseling cases involve experiences with romance while abroad. They all meet with dissatisfactory results in the end, this is the common characteristic of many study abroad romances. I think in large part this is because their love is built on the “drawbridge effect”. That is, in dangerous environments, people will have the incorrect physiological reactions, which leads to easier arousal of intimate feelings.  “For all study abroad students, getting used to a foreign country and culture is doubtlessly being thrown into a dangerous environment. This environment might also produce misdirected romances out of the psychological need to avoid danger.” Dr. Zhou admits, most such romances fail in the end.

 

Geographical loss of gender balance makes finding love even harder

The gender ratio of Chinese studying abroad is skewed in areas of foreign countries with highly developed technology sectors. In fact, at many schools on the East Coast of the US, there are more females studying abroad in business, arts, and literature departments. Most males going abroad for MAs and PhDs study engineering, and they are generally introverted and unwilling to actively pursue [relationships]. Often, When compared with the openness and humor of foreign men, girls find their attentions shifting.

Zhu Yuezeng, a medical doctor who has been in the US for 9 years, has attended matchmaking activities in the Washington D.C. area with twice as many females in attendance as males. He says that many of these girls couldn’t find partners in the area, and that they often choose to move to California or other areas with more men rather than going back to their home countries. “Actually, it’s not hard for a woman to get married in the US, and few return to China. Since their standards are high, and they’d have to compete with other Chinese women [in China], their chances for success there are too low, not as good as staying in America.” Plus, marriage is a fast way for female students abroad to get the proper status and a Green Card.

 

Can love survive the 10,000 KM trip across the Pacific?

For many studying abroad, moving tens of thousands of miles is an even greater struggle than a long-distance relationship. But there are those whose love has endured. Yvonne and Lee have been together for four years, you could say it was love at first sight, and they hadn’t been apart a day since. Now they’ve decided to apply to study at the same school in New York– Adelphi University. They are lucky, and we wish them all the best, at the same time hoping that their four years of love can stand the test of living in a foreign environment. Maybe it will make their love even stronger.

Wu Hao and his girlfriend got to know each other at UDM, the stress of study abroad causing them to tell each other everything about themselves. With time, their feelings grew, and they started dating. Even though they graduated, Wu Hao moved to his girlfriend’s hometown after returning to China so that they could support one another. “Actually, love is taking care of one another, but in a foreign country, this feeling is intensified. We looked after each other more at that time… that was when we really experienced mutual dependency,” said Wu Hao. “I see her as part of my life now, and I only feel the warmth of home where she is.”

 

Source: http://edu.163.com/14/0804/10/A2Q0TRSD00294IIH.html

Date of publication: August 1, 2014

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chinese students in usA recent CCTV news report revealed that on  July 17th, “a 19 year old Chinese student in Italy unexpectedly died.” The news caused a surge of public commentary. Most internet users felt sorry for this young girl, but there were those who took delight in the tragedy.

One internet user commented, “I’ve been very safe growing up at home. I don’t have money to go abroad, so being poor is kind of good luck. I have no sympathy for this kind of stuff. She deserved to die, anyway, they’re all second-generation rich!” Reading such words, one really can’t help but gasp. Such cold blood? Such hate for the rich? Or is some deeper psychological issue at play? Is study abroad really the exclusive right of second-generation rich?

 

Study abroad is not just for second-generation now

Many people think that only “rich people” with “wealthy family background” choose to study abroad. So how much does it cost to study abroad after all? Can someone “scrape together” enough money? Let’s look at what it costs to study abroad in various countries.

The United States has the world’s largest collection of higher education establishments, and many students hope to study there. There is a large range of tuitions for schools in the United States, with yearly tuition at public schools ranging from 70,000 to 150,000 RMB per year. Private schools are comparatively somewhat higher, from about 150,000 to 200,000 RMB per year. Living expenses are according to personal need and city of location. Generally, second-tier US cities are about 70,000 RMB per year for an individual, while in New York and other larger cities, living expenses can be kept under 120,000 RMB. Overall, if a student chooses to go to a public school in a second-tier city, expenses can be kept within about 200,000 RMB a year. If you’re an MA student on a two-year program, 400,000 RMB can cover all your study abroad expenses. Students who have the chance to work or apply for scholarships can lighten the burden of their expenses, sometimes even by half.

Canada and Australia are superior to the United States in terms of immigration. In recent years, Australia and Canada have also become hotspots for study abroad. Australia, for example, has undergraduate tuitions of between 120,000 and 150,000 RMB per year, with graduate tuitions about 20,000 to 30,000 higher. In terms of living expenses, about 80,000 to 100,000 RMB is enough for a student. Although it’s not as easy to apply for Australian scholarships as it is to apply for US scholarships, there’s not much difference in terms of the time required. An MA student on a one-year program, 200,000 RMB should be enough. If you want to save a bit more, work-study programs are’t a bad choice. Don’t be shocked if you’ve heard some people spend 100,000 RMB on an Australian MA. Work-study programs allow students from less wealthy families go abroad to continue their studies.

With the development of China’s economy and the increase of the RMB’s exchange rate, study abroad is no longer only for the rich. Many people are relying on their own hard work to fulfill their study abroad dream. Also, as the funds necessary to live in some big cities in China are rising rapidly, the difference between the cost of studying in China and studying abroad is getting steadily decreasing.

 

Respect life & reject “hatred of the wealthy”

As for those who die abroad, we should mourn and express sympathy. This is respect for life. The cold-blooded and sneering crowd that delights in tragedy either suffers from “sour grapes” mentality or is dissatisfied with real life. No matter what, she has died, and we hope respect for life can be maintained, and those who hold a “rich hating” mentality can refrain from being heartless spectators.

 

Original publication date: 7/18/2013

Source: http://edu.163.com/13/0718/17/9436EN3K00294IIH.html

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Many “Foreign” University Applicants in Guangdong Have Never Left China

May 25, 2013

A student from Hong Kong named Liang Jing (pseudonym) is attending Jinan University in Guangdong. She told Yicai Daily News that not only did she get extra points on her entry test because of her Hong Kong citizenship, the topics were easier as well, with fewer subjects, and humanities as the focus. Literature, language, and […]

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Class of 32 Students in Wuhan All Admitted to Famous US Schools

May 16, 2013

A class of 32 students were all admitted to US colleges and universities within the nation’s top 64 schools, with more than a few heading to Duke and Wellesley. These are the outstanding achievement of Wuhan Foreign Language School’s “Sino-American Class”. With the approval of the local Department of Education today, Wuhan’s #6 High School, […]

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Short-Term Study Abroad Tours Aim at Qingdao Schoolchildren

April 23, 2013

RMB 20,000 for a half month experiencing famous schools Qingdao Daily News: Several travel agencies told reporters yesterday that although there are still more than two months before students start summer vacation, the number of families inquiring about and signing up for various “overseas study travel” programs is growing steadily. These programs are the best […]

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Chinese Students in the Eyes of Local Foreign School Students: Busy but Quiet

February 24, 2013

Original publication date: 2/21/13 Zhejiang Online-Qianjiang Evening News: Zoe, a teacher of English language and literature at the University of California, recently told reporters about an old colleague who loved teaching. The teacher was very old, but still unwilling to retire (in the United States, professors are employed for life, and decide themselves when to […]

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Wasting Food: A Study Abroad Student’s Perspective

February 4, 2013

Original publication date: 2/1/13 Henan Business News: Xu works in a Chinese restaurant where all the staff are Chinese. When he first started work there, one of the old staff told him, “We dislike Chinese customers the most.” Xu didn’t understand, and thought the workers just blindly worshipped everything foreign. “You’ll understand eventually,” tersely said […]

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Questions That Most Annoy Chinese Study Abroad Returnees

January 31, 2013

Original date of publication: Jan. 31, 2013 You went to England, so why didn’t you go to Oxford? Correspondent Liu Weining reports that a list of “questions study abroad returnees are most annoyed by” has been spreading rapidly on the web since yesterday. “You went to England, so why did’t you go to Oxford”, “You […]

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Higher Education Arbitrage

January 17, 2013

Unfortunately, work’s been too busy to publish a new translation over the past few days, but I do have some in the pipeline. In the meantime, here’s an interesting article from The Chronicle of Higher Education that was linked on Sinocism. It covers the phenomenon of Chinese students at US universities returning to China for […]

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2012 Events in Study Abroad (part 2)

January 11, 2013

September: Online Study Abroad Agencies Attracting Customers With Low Prices are Unreliable Pay agents just 600 RMB and get an offer from a school, and you don’t even have to pay until you’ve received the offer! Does that grab your attention? Since September, an account on Sina Weibo’s study abroad-related groups going by the name […]

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