imgres-2August 2nd is Qixi Festival (Chinese Valentines Day). Love and marriage can become an issue for students going abroad. Some couples will find a way to keep things together no matter what and face the future together, others will give up with a sigh and continue their search.

 

How hard is it for students abroad to understand themselves?

One student named Alex, who is working on his PhD in Math while abroad, calculated that the probability of finding a girlfriend in one year of study abroad is 17.1%. Using Bayesian statistics, he found the probability of marrying this girlfriend is just 5.6%.

An investigation of over 3000 study abroad returnees entitled Large-Scale Investigation of Students Returning from Study Abroad shows those studying abroad were most distressed by “emotional isolation”. National and high-level Psychological Counsellor Zhou Xiaopeng explained, “100% of study abroad students counseling cases involve experiences with romance while abroad. They all meet with dissatisfactory results in the end, this is the common characteristic of many study abroad romances. I think in large part this is because their love is built on the “drawbridge effect”. That is, in dangerous environments, people will have the incorrect physiological reactions, which leads to easier arousal of intimate feelings.  ”For all study abroad students, getting used to a foreign country and culture is doubtlessly being thrown into a dangerous environment. This environment might also produce misdirected romances out of the psychological need to avoid danger.” Dr. Zhou admits, most such romances fail in the end.

 

Geographical loss of gender balance makes finding love even harder

The gender ratio of Chinese studying abroad is skewed in areas of foreign countries with highly developed technology sectors. In fact, at many schools on the East Coast of the US, there are more females studying abroad in business, arts, and literature departments. Most males going abroad for MAs and PhDs study engineering, and they are generally introverted and unwilling to actively pursue [relationships]. Often, When compared with the openness and humor of foreign men, girls find their attentions shifting.

Zhu Yuezeng, a medical doctor who has been in the US for 9 years, has attended matchmaking activities in the Washington D.C. area with twice as many females in attendance as males. He says that many of these girls couldn’t find partners in the area, and that they often choose to move to California or other areas with more men rather than going back to their home countries. “Actually, it’s not hard for a woman to get married in the US, and few return to China. Since their standards are high, and they’d have to compete with other Chinese women [in China], their chances for success there are too low, not as good as staying in America.” Plus, marriage is a fast way for female students abroad to get the proper status and a Green Card.

 

Can love survive the 10,000 KM trip across the Pacific?

For many studying abroad, moving tens of thousands of miles is an even greater struggle than a long-distance relationship. But there are those whose love has endured. Yvonne and Lee have been together for four years, you could say it was love at first sight, and they hadn’t been apart a day since. Now they’ve decided to apply to study at the same school in New York– Adelphi University. They are lucky, and we wish them all the best, at the same time hoping that their four years of love can stand the test of living in a foreign environment. Maybe it will make their love even stronger.

Wu Hao and his girlfriend got to know each other at UDM, the stress of study abroad causing them to tell each other everything about themselves. With time, their feelings grew, and they started dating. Even though they graduated, Wu Hao moved to his girlfriend’s hometown after returning to China so that they could support one another. “Actually, love is taking care of one another, but in a foreign country, this feeling is intensified. We looked after each other more at that time… that was when we really experienced mutual dependency,” said Wu Hao. “I see her as part of my life now, and I only feel the warmth of home where she is.”

 

Source: http://edu.163.com/14/0804/10/A2Q0TRSD00294IIH.html

Date of publication: August 1, 2014

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imgres-1Students at primary and secondary schools will no longer be required to “courageously struggle” and “stand up for what’s right”. Yesterday, the Beijing Ministry of Education official website published a Primary & Secondary School Student Rules (Draft Soliciting Suggestions), asking for suggestions and opinions from the public. City residents can submit feedback through email and various other methods until the 20th of this month.

Reporters from the Beijing Morning Post read over the new draft and found that compared to the 2004 version, one of the original rules was missing, making a total of nine rules. The new draft still includes the “three loves”, “three emphases”, and “three protections”, which are love of motherland, love of study, love of labor, emphasis on culture, emphasis on honestly, emphasis on rule of law, protection of safety, protection of health, and protection of homeland. These items are clarified and requirements are made more specific.

According to reporters, the 2004 publication of Primary & Secondary School Student Rules, Primary School Daily Behavioral Regulations, and Secondary School Daily Behavioral Regulations (below referred to as “Rules” and “Regulations”) were broadly adopted and implemented by schools, being actively brought into the educational culture and producing clear results. With the changing times, the process of implementing Rules and Regulations  also encountered some issues, such as the impracticality of some rules and the redundancy and excess of content in certain parts of Regulations. For this reason, the Ministry of Education began the process of revising rules in 2012,  with a committee of experts researching specific topics. Then, the Ministry broadly received advice and opinions from the experts, as well as primary and secondary school principals, local Departments of Education, and others through conferences and other means. The revision work continued to take current trends into account, prioritizing basic and easy to remember principles, and stressing implementability, thus merging Rules and Regulations to produce the new Primary & Secondary School Student Rules (Draft Soliciting Suggestions).

Reporters noted the first rule in the 2004 edition was, “Love the motherland, love the people, and love the Chinese Communist Party”. In the new edition, it has been changed to “Love the motherland,” with the following explication, “Respect the national flag and national emblem, stand while singing the national anthem as a group, salute while the flag is raised, understand the country’s past and present situation.” The content is more specific and has clearer requirements for primary and secondary school students.

The new Rules has also added other timely clauses, like “cultivate the habit of reading” under “love of study”, “limit time on the internet” under “protection of health”, and “properly sort trash” under “protection of homeland”. These all stick to the real life situations of primary and middle school students today.

Additionally, the new version of the Rules has removed ”courageously struggle” and “stand up for what’s right”  that appeared in the 2004 edition.

 

Primary & Secondary School Student Rules (Draft Soliciting Suggestions)

1. Love the motherland, respect the national flag and national emblem, stand while singing the national anthem as a group, salute while the flag is raised, understand the country’s past and present situation.

2. Love study, be diligent in thought and question. Take pleasure in enquiry, be attentive in class and lectures, bravely state your opinions. Turn in your homework on time, and cultivate the habit of reading.

3. Love labor and take care of things for yourself. Actively accept housework, proactively clean your home, and get involved in your community. Enthusiastically volunteer and serve, and experience the products of labor.

4. Emphasize culture and respect teachers, parents, and elders. Treat others in a friendly and fair manner, be appropriate and respectful in word and deed, form lines on your own, maintain public sanitation, and care for public property.

5. Emphasize honesty, punctuality, and honor your commitments. When you recognize your mistakes, correct them. Have a sense of responsibility, don’t plagiarize and don’t cheat, don’t take things from others, and if you borrow things, return them in a timely manner.

6. Emphasize rule of law and respect the rules of your school. Help keep an orderly class, promote awareness of the rules, get to know the law, and don’t engage in illegal activities.

7. Protect safety, stop at all red lights and proceed at green lights. Guard against drowning, don’t play with fire, understand requirements in order to protect yourself, stay away from drugs, and treat life preciously.

8. Protect health and cultivate healthy and sanitary habits. Don’t smoke and don’t drink, limit time on the internet, reject bad information, exercise regularly, and maintain a positive attitude.

9. Protect your homeland by conserving food, water, and electricity. Properly sort garbage, take care of trees, grass, and flowers, lead a low-carbon and environmentally friendly life, and protect the natural environment.

 

Source: http://edu.163.com/14/0803/07/A2N5FK8K00294M9N.html

Original publication date: August 3, 2014

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The Three Things Yale Didn’t Teach Me

August 3, 2014

Original Published in 2012 For the eight years that George Bush and Dick Cheney were in office, Chinese people liked to joke that if you graduated from Yale, you could become President, and if you dropped out of Yale, you could be come Vice-President. This year, over 500 top students from around China will fight [...]

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Over 60 % Agree: End Gaokao “Moral Thought” Extra Points

August 2, 2014

Recently, a point-adding scandal occurred at a high school in Jixi County, Heilongjiang. In this case, points were added to the Gaokao scores of 12 students based their superior moral thought. The county board of education called these this the “Lei Feng class”, saying that the “overall quality of the individuals in this class was [...]

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Student Bankers Take 40% of Loan Interest as Bonuses at Beijing High School

November 18, 2013

The “Dream-Come-True Bank” was started by Beijing #11 High School students themselves. Students used the operating model of a commercial bank, aside from the fact that they only make loans, and do not take deposits. When students need funding for an activity, want a loan for a project, or meet with personal financial difficulties… behind the [...]

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International Class Trend Reaches Xinjiang

November 13, 2013

With “international classes” in public schools, high school students can apply to Harvard, Cambridge, and other top international universities directly upon graduation. In September of this year, Urumqi City #12 High School opened its first international class, putting its first set of high school students on the international track. There are 40 lucky students in [...]

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Lead Teacher Extorts Money by Inviting Students to Son’s Wedding, Parents Claim

November 12, 2013

A Shenyang  resident with a child in the 9th year of one city middle school says he just received a phone call from the child’s lead teacher with an invitation to take part in her son’s wedding tomorrow. The teacher has told numerous parents, which is quite worrisome; the students will soon take the high [...]

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College Freshman in Wuchang Hangs Cash Out to Dry

November 12, 2013

Bo Zhuliang is a freshman at a university in Wuchang. Yesterday, he went to the showers with his roommates, where the wallet of one roommate surname Yao got wet. After retuning to the room, the roommate quietly hung up the wet bills one by one on clothespins to dry. The boys all had a good [...]

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Boy Learning to Fry Eggs Feeds Father Eggs for 20 Days; Father Doesn’t Dare Go Home

September 17, 2013

Xi’an Evening News: Mr. Li, who lives in the Longgang Garden community of Weiyang Road, felt both happy and helpless in his situation. His 8 year old son, Mumu, was required by his school to learn the new skill of frying an egg. With encouragement, Mumu developed an unrelenting interested in frying eggs, and every [...]

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Weird Dish Craze at University Cafeterias

September 10, 2013

Peach braised tofu, fried mooncakes with peppers… in fact, quite a few “weird dishes” are actually “good combos”.   East China Normal University (stir-fried corn and grapes): Although most students said they “don’t dare to try it,” this dish actually looks pretty good.   Hubei Institute of Economics (stir-fried tomatoes and pineapple): When trying to prevent the [...]

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